Gallery

To see our latest galleries of Alternative Process Photography created in Marrakech, Fez, Rome, Sri Lanka, Florence and Toronto (coming soon will be Athens and London) please scroll down the page.

FLORENCE, ITALY

Pinhole Photography

Tripods are accepted almost everywhere with no problems (not inside museums though, although you wouldn't be pinholing inside anyway). The locals are so very used to seeing cameras of all styles that nobody gave me any trouble at all when they saw my box camera. You only issue might be, apart from the huge amount of other tourists battling for space in summer, that many of the buildings and statues are very light in colour, so against a bright sky your exposures will have to be spot on, if you're using paper negs, to get anything worthwhile. But you'll have fun trying! There's so much good material everywhere, it's a real joy to pinhole in Florence.

ROME, ITALY

Pinhole Photography

I encountered no issues with making pinhole photos in Rome. Tripods are accepted almost everywhere with no problems, even in the Roman Forum where signs at the entrance say you have to get pemission to use tripods. The reality is, though, that the guards are relaxed about such things, especially when the camera balanced on top of the tripod is clearly a non professional wooden box. If you don't want to take a tripod though (I have made two pinhole trips to Rome, one with a tripod and one without) there are plenty of old pillars and newer bollards to balance your camera on, so long exposures are no problem. The sun may well feel and look brighter in Rome than in Northern Europe but I noticed that exposure times are pretty much the same.

SRI LANKA

Pinhole Photography

The Sri Lankan people are very relaxed about any sort of photography so you'll get no problems if you start working with unconventional cameras. Your issues might be lack of light, and the humidity. The jungle seemed to suck up light, to the extent that exposure times for some ruins was 3 times what I'd expect them to be back in England. My advice is to have your first couple of days as test days. Shoot a variety of scenes, develop them in your hotel bathroom and see how the land lies. If I hadn't done this all of my shots would have come out blank as I started off severely underestimating exposure times. The humidity will make it nearly impossible for you to keep your fingerprints off your paper when you change it (if you're using film, no problem) and I found that used papers often stuck together in the change bag, which can lead to the emulsion sticking together when pulling them apart. You can use this to your advantage though, if you think about where you put your fingers. A thumbprint can really liven up a bland sky!

 

MARRAKECH, MOROCCO

Pinhole Photography

Carrying a tripod seemed essential at first as there were few flat surfaces to rest the wooden box pinhole camera on. However, the tripod didn't last long. Firstly, there is so little space in the old part of Marrakech as the alleyways are narrow and full of people and motorbikes so to have a tripod set up for what might be 2 or 3 minutes (the alleys rarely see full sun so long exposures are needed quite often) without it getting kicked about is a luxury that was rarely afforded us. Secondly, people thought that a tripod meant we were professionals, and in their eyes professionals must be earning lots of money out of their photography, and if we were earning from images we took of their local mosque or alleyway, then why shouldn't they? Demands for money got tiring so in the end I just rested the camera on any available surface and became as invisible as possible. I'm not going to lie, making pinhole photos in Morocco is a difficult business, but the images that came out of such an experience can be very satisfying indeed. Here are a few of them. They are all taken with a lenless wooden box, straight onto Illford Multigrade Photographic Paper, with exposures ranging from 12 seconds to 3 minutes. People gave me less hassle with the pinhole than with the digital SLR, probably because they didn't know what the pinhole was.

 

TORONTO, CANADA

Pinhole Photography

We never bothered to carry a tripod for our Box Brownie camera in Toronto, there were enough rubbish bins and other flat surfaces in the streets to balance the camera on whilst it took it's 12 to 60 second exposures. The only troubles you may have is the cold if you come in winter (it was rarely above minus 5 during our most recent stay in the city during February 2014) which will make it hell to stand around for long periods of time (exposures in winter will also be longer due to lack of light, so you may be standing around for anything up to 3 minutes if your pinhole cameras are anything like ours), and the fact that if your pinhole camera doesn't look like a modern camera some security minded pepole can get a little touchy, thinking it may be some sort of bomb. A trick to set them at ease is to take a few digital snaps first, to let them know what is it you're doing. Here are some pinhole images that we've taken in Toronto.

Artistamp Photography

There weren't any negative issues with taking Artistamp style in Toronto. The process uses a 1970's SLR that doesn't look so different to modern digitals so people understand what you are up to and the exposures are only about 1/30th of a second so the only waiting around you do is whilst you change photo paper in the dark bag, which is still difficult in winter for the same reasons as pinhole is - unless you based yourself in a warm place, it's too cold to hang around doing such things! Here are a few artistamps we made.

FEZ, MOROCCO

Pinhole Photography

I'd learnt from Marrakech that whilst carrying a tripod seemed essential at first as there were few flat surfaces to rest the wooden box pinhole camera on, the reality was that there is so little space in the old part of Fez as the alleyways are narrow and full of people and motorbikes that to have a tripod set up for what might be 2 or 3 minutes (the alleys rarely see full sun so long exposures are needed quite often) without it getting kicked about was a luxury that was rarely afforded me. Also, the great differences in contrast meant that although I took over 30 exposures in the old part of town, very few of them came out, and none were worth showing, apart from the one of Andalous Mosuqe, below.

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